HDR Architecture Photography – Expanding the Horizons

Architecture and photography – these are two separate forms of art, each living their separate, unique, and independent lives at the first sight. However, the points of contact between architecture and photography are really numerous. Today, we want to show you magnificent results of the art process, stemming from the amazing and impressive fusion of the best architecture designs and innovative photography technique, called HDR. The key purpose of the High Dynamic Range Imaging here is to represent or portrait architectural masterpieces at such levels of contrast and brightness, which are as much close as possible to the levels we normally observe in the natural environment.

Amazing depth and intensity of colors, diversity of shades and halftones are combined with perfect lines of buildings, authentic shapes, and innovative materials. Such combinations, which you can see at this gallery of HDR architecture photographs, are capable of generating powerful streams of emotions, aroused by aesthetic impulses. One of the benefits of HDR photography is that it enables viewers to see the details, which usually remain invisible on the standard photographic image. This feature is especially valuable for architecture photography, where every single detail matters and contributes to the proper perception of the entire ensemble.

HEP NAVIO, Umeda, Osaka by Hidehiko Sakashita

Boardwalk by Peter Hernandez

Sculpture, Tower Bridge, London by tonybill

Asakusa at Dusk by Kuroko orlandojpn

Ebley mill by Pete Jones

Tiger’s Nest, Paro, Bhutan by Timothy Neesam

Shinjyuku Stream by Violence Visual Shock

Alexander Liberman’s Olympic Iliad and the Space Needle by Michael Holden

214/1000 – Salford, Media City 16 by Mark Carline

IMG_9602 by Shay Sapir

Auditorium van Santa Cruz de Tenerife by Molair1

Burj al Arab by Crazy Mr Pixel

Salford Quays – Mediacity by Neil Curry

Skywards by Stephen Brennan

Credit Suisse Oerlikon Zurich by Andy Kobel

Cleveland Clinic – Las Vegas by tmac97slc

Patemonster Square – London by Luis Fernando Useche

Kantoorgebouw Facet te Utrecht A2 by Molair1

ING House Amsterdam (hdr) by Molair1

Old Gold by Jervinn Lim

713 Years Old by pattpoom

Brandhorst Museum by Christian Beirle González

The Pagodas at the Singapore Chinese Garden :: HDR by Artie Ng

All the Way Up by Douglas Mo

Into The Blue by Erik van Hannen

Inverted Vertigo by Daniel Cheong

Light Trails on Marquam Freeway at Night – HDR by David Gn

John Hancock Tower by Werner Kunz

Library From Another Dimension by Jason Hoover

The spaceship has landed… Beijing Opera House by Sergio Amiti

Gotham City by Philipp Klinger

Timber-framed houses in Petite France, Strasbourg by Mike G. K.

HDR#05 – Serenity | Ketenangan Abadi? by AnNamir™

WATER TOWER by Paulo Brandao

HDR / Architecture / Central City / Surrey / SFU / BC / Building / Clouds / Glass / Tower by Kyle Bailey

HDR – St. Ignatius Church at Seattle University. by Zach Den Adel

Architecture by Sophie Saller

HDR Building by Mads Hindhede

Sears (Willis) Tower, Chicago, USA: Tourist Attraction #1 by J.T. Noriega

A Nuvali Sunset (Vertorama // HDR) – Ayala, Laguna, Philippines by J.T. Noriega

Medienhafen Düsseldorf by Jörg Dickmann

Conrad Hotel Bali – Wedding Chappel IV by Christian Beirle González

Back to School by Esther Seijmonsbergen

Comments


Leave a comment

Error: Unable to create directory wp-content/uploads/2016/12. Is its parent directory writable by the server?

With 30 years of life experience behind my shoulders, today I find myself focused mainly around two core values: my family (I am a happy husband and a proud father) and IT in its broadest meaning, including but not limited to hardware and software techniques and innovations. My special interest and true passion is photography. Here I am ready to put my signature under each word, once said by Dorothea Lange: “The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.” Being a part of Cruzine team, I enjoy instant process of learning as well as sharing my own experience in photography and IT with the readers of this digital magazine.