Abstract Photography – How to See the Hidden Aspects of Reality

Abstractionism refers to one of the youngest movements in art, which appeared about a century ago. It is interesting to note, that abstract art is commonly described as the specific visual language, where colors, forms and lines are used to create illustrations, capable to exist independently from their visual counterparts in the real life. Though originally appeared in painting, abstractionism concepts and ideas soon penetrated into many other types of art and photography is among them. Cruzine collected some interesting examples of abstract photography in this gallery to demonstrate our readers all the boundless capabilities of abstract photography art.

Amazing colors and unpredictable forms create the special charm, which can be found only in the abstract art works. It is an exclusive option of abstractionism to allow viewers use all their imagination to guess what is depicted on the picture and what message the author tried to deliver through his work, if any, of course :-) There is, however, an interesting aspect to note about abstract photography – artists mostly do not create abstract compositions here; instead, they find abstract forms in the details of the real environment. It is amazingly, but there is so much abstractionism in the ordinary and familiar things around us. Have a look at the abstract photo gallery and explore the exciting world, where reality refracts and modifies.

Red, Red, Wine by Remco van de Sanden

+ + + + + + + by Hugo Amador

Photo by Luigi Benedetti

Boat by Luigi elson

Madonna by Ursula I Abresch


Photo by Arash Karimi

3 in 3 by Belu Gheorghe

Photo by Luigi Benedetti

3D by Riccardo Monaco


Photo by Luigi Benedetti

Unfolding2 by MMarie

Moving waters by Emilian Chirila

Evolution by Verisäkeet

In the dark by Niko Teran

Slow spiral by Michael Jacobs

Simplicity by John Roias

The pull of light by Ursula I Abresch

I put my trust in you by Bjørnar Sollie

Land of the Evening Sun by Lars Klottrup

Ride the wave by Sherwin James

Entrance to another world by Dragan Mihajlovic

Close the curtains its too beautiful out there by Gerard Sexton

Kk experiences by Jonathan Hedrén

Disc World by Ian James

Tilework by J-F Garneau

Fractured landscape by Giuseppe Pagano

Abstract Love by Kei

OPPOSITE IN RED by Thomas Holtkoetter

Curves by Tineke Visscher

Yantra Mantra: Lost in Time and Space by Sanjay Nanda

Rooftop Symphony by Frank Daske

Falling brilliantly by Pedro Moura Pinheiro

Split by Sven Fennema

Goldfind by Elin Torger

VIDE by Brian Hagy

Shades of grey by photographics

So gentle, so furious by Ursula I Abresch

LOST IN WINTER by Thomas Holtkoetter

A Little Tipsy by Kirk Pullen

Eternity by Jason Abrahamson

Perspective II by Jacob Jovelou

The Two of Us by Martin Gremm

Torso by Per

Waves by Lars Johansson / Quicksound

Between land and water by Carola Onkamo

Droplets by Manny Larioza

Sweeping in the rain by Ursula I Abresch

From Below by sue

From Above by sue

No 6 by Anne Lene Baanrud

Welding Gas Tanks by Jarrett Gorin

No 5 by Anne Lene Baanrud

End of spiral by Jaroslav Cmehil

Landscape of age by Hella Stroh

No 1 by Anne Lene Baanrud

Long Beach 3 by Bruce A Carter

Storm by André Pelletier

Mini-landscapes by Maria E. Salvador

Fountain by Jon Wild

FC 101 Two drops by Fernand Hick

The Gathering by Mattias Ormestad

Photo by nifanta

My Summerland by incredi

Magic Lamp by Patrick Latter

Gradation by Hengki24

Interlude experimental 15 by Benoit Paille

Granny’s Suitcase by NonIntentonal

Transitional States by tExTuReMaTtIc

Sand Dance by ghiru

Forest of the Gods by rubberman542

Pipelines by Matt LeGault

Purple Water Rings 6 by Michael Dykstra

Coil by Victoria Lin

Rural Frame XXXIII by Luigi Esposito

Agave Abstract 5 by Joanna Kossak

The Foot of the Rock of Tears by Mikael Kapanaga

Confusion by EngelScarlett

A Natural Curve by Brian Jones

The lock by incolorwetrust

Power by Hengki24

Soul 2 by Ana Loncar

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Pavol Janovicek

With 30 years of life experience behind my shoulders, today I find myself focused mainly around two core values: my family (I am a happy husband and a proud father) and IT in its broadest meaning, including but not limited to hardware and software techniques and innovations. My special interest and true passion is photography. Here I am ready to put my signature under each word, once said by Dorothea Lange: “The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.” Being a part of Cruzine team, I enjoy instant process of learning as well as sharing my own experience in photography and IT with the readers of this digital magazine.